/*
  * Contact authors William Jolitz & Lynne Jolitz via the web.
  */

void
the_past() {

/*
  * Authors of 386BSD were William Jolitz and Lynne Jolitz. William Jolitz did 2BSD(76-81) on PDP-11,
  * a collection of work from many sources. Lynne Jolitz was an early 2BSD user (and critic)
  * who challenged BSD system assumptions, reduced them, wrote and redesigned them.
  * 386BSD departed from BSD as a return to UNIX origins but in modern form.
  */
authors_origin("Authors of 386BSD origin","June 1982");

/*
  * Origin of the 386BSD code was with the 4BSD release by University of California,
  * from work done at Symmetric Computer Systems, makers of the 375 computer system.
  */
code_origin("Code origin of 386BSD","May 1985");

/*
  * Inception date of 386BSD was with the publishing of "A Modest Proposal".
  * Actual coding started in June, and the first success was a bootstrap
  * from DOS later in the month. When it looked like it could be shared
  * as a group development project, this document was written to gather
  * a community around it.
  */
date_inception("A Modest Proposal","October 1989");

/*
  * Essays on the CDROM.
  */
essays_on_cdrom("CDROM Essays", "Sept 1994");

/*
  * 386BSD departed from other systems in having a compartmentalized structure
  * that allowed a "roll back" to earlier working versions of a dynamic component,
  * where components were completely independant. It was intended that this
  * modularity would increase resilience, not make the system fragile by having
  * more working parts ("shared libraries", "kernel loadable modules", ...)
  * with conflicts.
  *
  * Current mechanisms with operating systems represent a step backward to be
  * avoided, as the advantage of them is minimal compared to the reliability lost.
  *
  */
modular_structure("Modular Structure");

/*
  * Origin of the 386BSD name was with the first 16Mhz release by Intel, starting the
  * architecture family. Most software vendors call all in this family, which includes
  * strangely enough the AMD 64-bit version, the "386" architecture.
  *
  * There has only been one architecture, no matter how refined or redefined by others
  * to suit peculiar needs.
  *
  * 386BSD is BSD on the 386.
  */
name_origin("Name origin of 386BSD", "May 1985");

/*
  * Maureen O'Gara is a journalist who covered USL/BSDI, and is now covering SCO/IBM.
  * Her hard hitting style leaves people wondering about bias - see "Is O'Gara Really Pro-Sco?"
  * Which has an excellent recount of the whole debacle. History repeats itself in peculiar ways.
  */
ogara("Press Coverage by O'Gara", "August 1992");

/*
  * 386BSD never was identical to BSD as released by the University of California Berkeley.
  * The agenda of releases by CSRG had different motivations than the simple point of 386BSD.
  * In particular, Net/2, Net/3, 4.4BSD and Lite versions went into areas where 386BSD could
  * not go. The reverse was true - past Net/2, nothing new from 386BSD went into CSRG.
  * BSD as released from Berkeley came to an end as a collaboration with Net/2.
  */
part_uc_berkeley("Where 386BSD Parts with Berkeley BSD", "December 1992");

/*
  * 386BSD was first released inside the University of California and the US
  * Department of Energy in 1989. Major parts were released in the Networking
  * II release that was labelled by University of Californa as "freely
  * redistributeable".
  *
  * Release 0.0 was made following to satisfy the obligation to the readers of
  * the porting series that an operational version of the code as an example be
  * available under the same terms. Release 0.1 eliminated many issues faced in
  * 0.0 release. Release 0.2 never happened with inability of formal release
  * handoff to an institution.
  *
  * Release 1.0 formalized the modular environment that was
  * intended for the final work with the University of California but released as
  * a instead.
  * Liner Notes: The 386BSD Release 1.0 CDROM Liner Notes
  */
past_releases("Releases of 386BSD", "December 1993");

/*
  * Porting series.
  */
porting_series("Porting Series in DDJ and Unix Magazin", "January 1991");

/*
  * Over a thousand pages of notes, correspondance, and documentation were organized
  * into a five volume book series known as "Source Code Secrets". The first of these
  * was "The Basic Kernel", which captured the essence of a kernel in extreme detail.
  * The intent with CD and book series was to capture the experience as a "living
  * example", and release subsequent materials as demand required and returns justified.
  * The book was also translated into Japanese (386bsd カーネルソースコードの秘密)
  */
publication("Publication of The Basic Kernel", "December 1996");

/*
  * Interview "The Unknown Hackers" in Salon about authors 386BSD experience.
  */
salon_interview("Unknown Hackers", "May 2000");

/*
  * Accurate view of what the role of BSD was, and should have continued to be.
  * "The Role of BSD in the Development of Unix" by Michael G. Brown.
  */
theroleofbsd("The Role of BSD in the Development of Unix", "August 1993");

/*
  * A user's view of 386BSD from the time. "386BSD: A Look Under The Hood." by Andrew McRae,
  * a 386BSD user experience.
  */
user_perspective("User Perspective", "January 1993");

/*
  * A comparative view of BSDs and Linux. "BSD-based OS Releases" by Rich Morin.
  */
variant_bsds("Variant BSD History", "November 1994");

return();

}